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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Free Webinar: Speaking and Listening Across the Common Core

Join Terry Roberts, director of whole child partner National Paideia Center, in a free webinar on how the Paideia Seminar can provide educators with a consistent and powerful way to teach speaking and listening standards. In this presentation, Roberts offers educators an opportunity to zero in on these College and Career Readiness anchor standards for the benefit of all learners.

Wednesday July 10, 2013, 3:00 p.m. eastern time
Register now!

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Supporting Teacher Growth with Instructional Rounds

Post written by Robert J. Marzano and Michael D. Toth

In Teacher Evaluation That Makes a Difference, our recommendations for best practices are based on the assumption that teacher evaluation should have two purposes—development and measurement—but that development should be the more important of the two. If districts and schools share this perspective, then they must provide teachers with direct support in their efforts to improve.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Make All Students Feel Special

ASCD Annual Conference and Exhibit Show

Post written by Rachel Syms, a native of Los Angeles who moved to Chicago to pursue a degree in journalism at Columbia College. She hopes to write for a magazine after graduation.

"How many of you, yourselves, were challenging, disruptive, or unmotivated back when you were in school?" That's the question Brian Mendler, adjunct professor at St. John Fisher College in New York, asked the room full of educators attending his 2013 ASCD Annual Conference session, "Motivate and Manage a Differentiated Classroom."

Mendler, author of The Taming of the Crew and coauthor of Strategies for Successful Classroom Management and Discipline with Dignity, admits that as a child he struggled with his disruptive behavior in the classroom and a severe learning disability that interfered with his reading capabilities. He says that he was able to get through school until the 4th grade, when faking it became a problem because of a difficult teacher he didn't get along with. Mendler says the teacher mocked him, called him lazy and unmotivated, and told him to try harder. After being labeled "emotionally disturbed" following a disagreement with the teacher, he was placed into self-contained special education for two years.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Engage and Motivate with ASCD’s Summer Boot Camp Webinar Series

ASCD Summer Boot Camp

Delve into summer learning with tips and strategies from a few of your favorite ASCD authors. The first session in the ASCD Summer Boot Camp Webinar Series kicks off Thursday, July 18, at 3 p.m. eastern time and presents a strategic approach to direct vocabulary instruction that helps students master key concepts and retain new terms. Other topics include teacher-led walk-throughs, curriculum, and motivation and engagement from a developmental science perspective.

Learn more about each session and register today!

 

ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Great Teaching Transcends Economic Hurdles

Post submitted on behalf of whole child partner American Association of School Librarians by Patty Saidenberg, librarian, George Jackson Academy, New York, N.Y.

I work as a librarian at George Jackson Academy (GJA) in New York, N.Y. Founded in 2002, GJA is an independent, nonsectarian upper elementary and middle school for academically capable boys from low-income and underserved families. Classes are small, teachers are passionate, and money is tight. That said, our graduates have attended some of the best high schools and private day schools in the nation. GJA graduates attend Columbia University, Princeton, NYU, and Wesleyan.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Escaping the Closed Circle of High School Reform

Post written by Robert Halpern, director of the doctoral program and chair of the research council at the Erikson Institute in Chicago.

A recent documentary,180 Days: A Year Inside an American High School, perfectly captures the lack of imagination of current high school reform efforts in the United States. In this documentary the beleaguered principal and staff of Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan High School scramble to prepare students for the D.C. CAS, a standardized test on which their individual and collective fates rest. (I will withhold the ending, for those of you who have not yet seen the documentary, directed by Jacquie Jones of the National Black Programming Consortium.)

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

From Data to Action: A Community Approach to Improving Youth Outcomes

Milbrey McLaughlin and Rebecca A. London - John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities

Post written by Milbrey McLaughlin, founding director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities at Stanford University, and Rebecca A. London, senior researcher at the John W. Gardner Center overseeing all analyses conducted with the Youth Data Archive. They are the editors of From Data to Action: A Community Approach to Improving Youth Outcomes.

Policy discussions about how to improve academic, social, and physical outcomes for today's youth typically take place solely within the domains of many individual youth-serving sectors. For instance, much of educators' current deliberation considers responses to the new Common Core State Standards and how to increase students' high school graduation and college attendance. Health professionals may focus on asthma management or obesity reduction. In social services, providers may talk about how to create seamless transitions for foster youth. Despite their common focus on young people, these youth-serving sectors typically are disconnected from, and uninformed about, each other's programs, policies, and approaches to serving youth—when in fact, local youth are constantly moving between them. These so-called institutional "silos" can result in unintended gaps in the web of supports that youth need, duplication of services, poorly aligned goals, and missed opportunities to be mutually reinforcing. How the community as a whole, rather than any one agency or program, meets the developmental needs of children and youth is important for supporting their pathways to productive adulthood.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Take Action: Support Effective Professional Development and Evaluation

The Effective Teaching and Leading Act (S. 1063) was recently introduced by United States Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), and we need your help in getting your Senators to support it! The bill would help ensure that teachers and principals are effectively trained, mentored, developed, and evaluated through proven, team-based professional development strategies.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Why I Hate High School

ASCD Annual Conference and Exhibit Show

Post written by Jasmine Sanborn, a senior digital and visual journalism student at Loyola University Chicago. She hopes to follow her passions for conservation and comics and someday join the ranks at National Geographic or Marvel Comics.

Horrible. Backbreaking. Traumatizing. Stressful. Idiotic.

These are just a few words a panel of five blended-learning students used to describe how they felt about the classic high school experience. Moderator Mickey Revenaugh of Connections Education emphasized that this is not to say that every school is like this, but that the school system is definitely changing.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Implications of the New “Poor”

Post written by Pam Capasso, Sara Gogel, Tracy Knight, and Janine Norris of Holly Glen Elementary School in Williamstown, N.J.

Holly Glen Elementary School serves approximately 580 students with one-third on free or reduced-price meals. Our school houses English language learners, students with autism, and students from low-income housing. In the past, Holly Glen comprised various socioeconomic levels ranging from upper class to lower income.

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