Podcast Whole Child Podcast

Reflective Teachers Are More Effective: Improvement Doesn’t Happen by Accident

Teachers that are more reflective are more effective in the classroom. The difference between learning a skill and being able to implement it effectively resides in our capacity to engage in deep, continuous thought about that skill. In other words, recognizing why we do something is often more important than knowing how to do it. Reflective practitioners are intentional in their actions, accurately assess their impact, adjust their actions on-the-fly, and engage in ongoing reflection.

On this episode of the Whole Child Podcast, we explore how to develop and grow our capacity for success through self-reflection and its impact on student learning, the quality of our schools, and the state of our profession.

Listen to the episode below or download here.

Panelists

  • Kim Price has been a teacher for 15 years and has only worked in Title 1 schools. Currently she is teaching 5th grade at Sun Valley Elementary School in Reno, Nevada. Connect with Price on Twitter @thisteacherocks.
  • Alisa Simeral is a school turnaround specialist and veteran educator who has guided school-based reform efforts as a teacher, dean, and instructional coach. Her emphasis is, and always has been, improving the adult-input factors that contribute to the betterment of the student-output results. Simeral partnered with Pete Hall to write two ASCD books together, Building Teachers' Capacity for Success: A Collaborative Approach for Coaches and School Leaders (2008) and Teach, Reflect, Learn: Building Your Capacity for Success in the Classroom (2015). Passionate about providing support where it's needed most—at the classroom level—her mantra is "When our teachers succeed, our students succeed." Connect with Simeral on Twitter @AlisaSimeral.
  • Pete Hall is a veteran school administrator and professional development agent who has dedicated his career to supporting the improvement of our education systems. Besides partnering with Alisa Simeral on two books together, he authored The First-Year Principal (Scarecrow Education, 2004) and Lead On! Motivational Lessons for School Leaders (Eye on Education, 2011). Hall currently works as an educational consultant as a member of the ASCD Faculty and trains educators worldwide. Connect with Hall on Twitter @EducationHall.

Good thinking doesn't happen without practice. What are your habits of reflection?

Comments (1)

Aaron Magnan

June 3, 2015

Hi!

It appears to me that reflection is exactly that: a habit.  And it is not necessarily a habit we were exposed to very often in our own education.  I still hear people admonish others saying, “You think too much.” 

In education, in my opinion, reflection needs to go deeper than reflection on practice, but also the classroom atmosphere and dynamic. 

I coincidentally wrote about this recently: http://aaronjmagnan.blogspot.com/2015/06/observation.html

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