Tagged “Child Development”

Podcast Whole Child Podcast

Teaching Students, Not Subjects

Magnolia Elementary serves 497 students from grades preK–five in suburban Baltimore, Md. The school is classified as Title I and 90 percent of the students qualify for free or reduced lunch. A staff of three administrators, three school counselors, 44 teachers, and 10 support personnel ensure a well-rounded learning environment is established for each child.

The school is committed to improving the physical and social-emotional health of each student. Since many of the students' home neighborhoods are not considered safe for outside play, the school has reworked its master schedule to allow for increased physical education periods and additional free play time connected to lunch periods. Magnolia Elementary also conducts movement sessions via its after-school intervention program.

The school has a mental health cohort that meets six times per year to evaluate the support the school is providing to teachers, staff, and students. As a Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (or PBIS, as it's often known) school, Magnolia Elementary believes in emphasizing positive behaviors and teaching character. To build a greater sense of school community, the school has created five "houses" on campus, and each house aligns with a specific character trait: responsibility, respect, cooperation, encouragement, and perseverance.

For this tremendous dedication and its many accomplishments, Magnolia Elementary is the 2015 winner of the Vision in Action: The ASCD Whole Child Award. On this episode of the Whole Child Podcast, you’ll hear from Principal Patricia Mason, Assistant Principal Stacey McCord, Title 1 Teacher Specialist Tara Sample, and teachers Kimberly Wheeler and Lauren Donnelly.

Listen to the episode below or download here.

How are you creating a culture and climate of support and success in your school? How do you know that you're succeeding?

Magnolia Elementary School is the sixth recipient of the Vision in Action: The ASCD Whole Child Award. Listen to previous award-winning schools as they share their stories and explain how they ensure that each child in their community is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged:

 

Podcast Whole Child Podcast

Hope, Meaning, and Challenge: The Building Blocks of Motivation

Teachers know that engaging and inspiring students initially requires building positive relationships and creating relevant learning experiences. Yet other key actions also matter: setting realistic expectations, creating a needs-satisfying classroom, and teaching students to self-evaluate and self-moderate. Students who are motivated and see meaning in what they learn progress faster and to higher levels, even when they start with knowledge or skill gaps. In fact, focusing on motivation and meaning is a classroom strategy that is often underutilized.

On this episode of the Whole Child Podcast, we take a look at how teachers can spark inner motivation in all students—from those who are disengaged from school to those who strive to succeed—and create meaningful connections that get students excited about learning.

Listen to the episode below or download it here.


Panelists

  • Whole Child Podcast - September 2014in this month's issue of Educational Leadership. He is currently the director of the master's program in behavior disorder at David Yellin College in Israel.
  • Ashanti Foster is the academic dean at Oxon Hill Middle School in Ft. Washington, Maryland. She has been a national staff developer for 13 years, providing teaching and learning experiences to students and teachers of Prince George's County Public Schools and beyond, and is also a National Board–certified teacher and an ASCD Emerging Leader. In addition to her roles in the education field, she is also a Girl Scout troop leader, blogger, dancer, wife, and mother of six. Connect with Foster on Twitter @NBCTeacherMommy.
  • John Hines is a world history and AVID teacher at Todd Beamer High School in Federal Way, Washington. He is the vice president of the Washington State Council for the Social Studies, an ASCD Emerging Leader, and a proud, lifelong resident of Tacoma, Washington. Connect with Hines on Twitter @jhhines57.

How do you encourage effort and spark motivation for learning with your students?

Klea Scharberg

Flipped Learning: Gateway to Student Engagement

Flip Your Classroom - ISTE & ASCDFlip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day, in a free webinar to learn how the flipped classroom model can help teachers gain more face-to-face time with students, foster real differentiated or personalized learning, and challenge students to take responsibility for their learning.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014, 3:00 p.m. eastern time
Register now!

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Walter McKenzie

MI21: Multiple Intelligences and Preparing Children for the 21st Century

Society is quickly shifting, and so with it shifts the dialog about meaningfully learning and contributing. What used to pass for preparation to participate in a democratic society with a free market economy no longer holds true. Public schools currently reflect the 1900s more than the 2000s, even as education bureaucracy has clamped down and locked in on traditional, measurable standards and assessments. Instead of opening things up to the marketplace of ideas, public schools have opened themselves up to the assessment and technology marketplace, investing in solutions to document and justify the last century's ideals.

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Jason Flom

Keeping a Hidden Population Safe at School

What percentage of students is it okay to let feel unsafe at school?

  1. 0 percent
  2. 1 percent
  3. 5 percent
  4. 10 percent

You, like me, probably answered zero percent. As an educator dedicated to a whole child approach to education, you recognize the value of each and every learner.

What if I told you we have allowed (albeit unintentionally in most cases), if not contributed to, an entire population of students feeling unsafe at school? A population of students you are most likely rooting for as they enter adulthood and pursue equal rights.

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Laura Varlas

Turning Around the Teen Brain by Building Effort

Neuroplasticity means humans have the ability to change their brains through repeated, adaptive practice. Buy-in, however, can be a huge hurdle in getting students to invest effort in the actions that will grow their brains.

"If the brain's not buying in, then it's not changing," author Eric Jensen noted in his 2014 ASCD Annual Conference session, "Turnaround Tools for the Teenage Brain."

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Leader to Leader

Got Questions on Differentiated Instruction? Join the #ASCDL2L Chat!

#ASCDL2L - July 2014On Tuesday night, July 1, from 8–9 p.m. eastern time, join ASCD leaders and educators on Twitter for an #ASCDL2L chat discussing Differentiated Instruction in the 21st century. Carol Ann Tomlinson (@cat3y) will be the special guest author, 2013 Emerging Leader PJ Caposey (@MCUSDSupe) will moderate, and Education Week Teacher (@EdWeekTeacher) will be the guest host. We can' t wait to see you there!

#ASCDL2L is a Twitter conversation for education leaders with monthly chats facilitated by ASCD leaders. If you care about improving the way educators learn, teach, and lead, join the #ASCDL2L conversation. Add your voice to our online community of educators.

Learning and Health

School Nutrition Environment and Services

Nutrition is essential for student success. Healthy, active, and well-nourished children are more likely to attend school and are more prepared and motivated to learn. Although the primary responsibility of schools is to foster academic achievement, schools have an exceptional opportunity to guide children toward healthier lifestyles by creating a healthy nutrition environment.

The school environment should encourage all students to make healthy eating choices and be physically active throughout the school day. We know schools cannot be responsible for the health and safety of their students at all times (such as when students area at home or out in the community); however, schools can and should ensure that students learn the knowledge and skills needed to make healthy decisions. School leaders can help encourage this by helping students make healthy choices using policies and practices that create a school environment that supports clear expectations for healthy behavior by faculty and staff, as well as students.

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Tisha Shipley

Planning Engaging Lessons Using Children’s Literature

In a world of test-driven instruction, teachers are still expected to have effective teaching strategies and teach children to love reading. It is very important that we as professionals take a look at how we introduce reading to children; what strategies we use to teach them to love reading; and how we can make it fun, engaging, and meaningful. This article discusses teaching objectives, skills that must be taught, and how they can be organized and successfully implemented by using children's literature. You may have to get a little creative, but creativity makes lessons engaging and worthwhile!

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Kevin Parr

End-of-Year Reflection: Think About the Whole Child

As the school year winds down, teachers are spending as much time reflecting on the past year as they are thinking about a summer filled with sit-down lunches, obligation-free evenings and weekends, and restful nights without dreaming about school.

Throughout the year teachers reflect continuously on particular interactions with students, a given lesson, or even a whole school day because they realize it is the key to improving their practice. At the end of the year, however, teachers should take time reflect on how things went overall to set themselves and their students up for success next year. Without a framework to guide teachers, reflecting on the entire school year can easily turn into spiraling self-talk with few results other than "this was the worst year ever" or "this was the best year ever." Nevertheless, teachers can engage in focused reflection that will truly help them to better meet the needs of the kids they will meet in September.

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