Tagged “College Career And Citizenship Readiness”

Nicole D. Nearor

Common Core “As A Scientist”

Although there are no current Common Core State Standards that are specifically written for science content, science teachers will be using the fundamental skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking within their science content to help students become ready for college and career .

One of the focuses of Common Core for English/Language Arts (ELA) is informational text. Interesting enough, as students transition from elementary to middle to high school, they encounter more informational text because of the core courses they are taking. The majority of the literary texts are only taught in the English and language arts classes. Therefore, students are required to read more informational text within their specific content areas. Further, students who are struggling readers are placed in reading classes in middle school and even in high school. Is it only the job of the English and language arts teachers or the reading teachers to teach the students how to read informational texts?

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Escaping the Closed Circle of High School Reform

Post written by Robert Halpern, director of the doctoral program and chair of the research council at the Erikson Institute in Chicago.

A recent documentary,180 Days: A Year Inside an American High School, perfectly captures the lack of imagination of current high school reform efforts in the United States. In this documentary the beleaguered principal and staff of Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan High School scramble to prepare students for the D.C. CAS, a standardized test on which their individual and collective fates rest. (I will withhold the ending, for those of you who have not yet seen the documentary, directed by Jacquie Jones of the National Black Programming Consortium.)

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Take Action: Support Effective Professional Development and Evaluation

The Effective Teaching and Leading Act (S. 1063) was recently introduced by United States Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), and we need your help in getting your Senators to support it! The bill would help ensure that teachers and principals are effectively trained, mentored, developed, and evaluated through proven, team-based professional development strategies.

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Rich McKinney

Moving Beyond the Textbook: Closing the Book on the Textbook-Dependent Classroom

A few weeks ago I was watching my daughters as they were working through drills during their weekly tennis lessons. I observed a group of elementary kids dutifully take their places, hit the ball, and then move to the next station. It was simple, efficient, and monotonous. Though they were learning the basics of tennis, the kids simply weren't having much fun. Their coach must have noticed because he immediately changed pace and led all the kids to an adjoining field next to the courts for a lively game of freeze tag. All the kids were laughing and loving it, though I found that it bore little resemblance to anything even remotely related to tennis. I was wrong. What looked to me to be free play was really the development of skills such as acceleration, lateral speed, and footwork. This coach recognized that sometimes you can leave the court and have fun while accomplishing goals.

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Walter McKenzie

Education’s Greatest Common Factor

Are you tired yet of working to the lowest common denominator? Think about it. Every problem under discussion in public education boils down to it. Funding. Staffing. Standards. What's the least, the minimum we can expect everyone to accept?

To make it sound reasonable, we reference "milestones" and "benchmarks" to suggest that anyone can go beyond these minimum expectations, but the reality is the lowest common denominator becomes the de facto goal. Bars are lowered. Expectations settle. Learning is minimized, meted out, and measured. But what if we changed the formula so that minimum measures of learning become the variable and student learning becomes the constant for success?

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Walter McKenzie

A Whole Child Education Transformation

Everyone freeze! Stop right where you are and look around. Survey the landscape. With all the clamoring and commotion in education, have you stopped to notice? Education transformation is already well under way. I know, I know. With all the posturing and politicking going on from your local school board to the state house to the White House, there's a public perception that it's business as usual. Voices of self-interest continue to tout the status quo. Advocates for the public interest continue to toe the bottom line. Amidst all the noise and distractions, education in 2013 can look and feel like more of the same.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

The Future of Education in a Globally Connected World

ASCD Annual Conference and Exhibit Show

Post written by Jasmine Sanborn, a senior digital and visual journalism student at Loyola University Chicago. She hopes to follow her passions for conservation and comics and someday join the ranks at National Geographic or Marvel Comics.

In our ever-evolving world, where is the future of education headed? "The Future of Education in a Globally Connected World," a panel discussion at ASCD's 68th Annual Conference and Exhibit Show featuring education experts from around the world, sought to answer this question and explore what we can learn from one another.

Moderated by ASCD Executive Director and CEO Dr. Gene R. Carter, the panel featured Siew Hoong Wong, Deputy Director-General of Education (Curriculum) from Singapore; Benjalug Namfa, Deputy Secretary General, Office of Basic Education Commission, Ministry of Education from Thailand; Pasi Sahlberg, Director General, Center for International Mobility and Cooperation and ASCD Board Member from Finland; and Hye-chong Han, Associate Research Fellow, Korea Institute for Curriculum and Evaluation from South Korea.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

ASCD Recognizes Outstanding Young Educators

2012 OYEA Winners Joshua Garcia (l) and Ryan Twentey (r)

ASCD salutes a new generation's passion for education excellence through this year's selection of two Outstanding Young Educator Award winners: Joshua Garcia, deputy superintendent of Tacoma Public Schools (Wash.), and Parkville High School (Parkville, Md.) teacher Ryan Twentey. Twentey teaches art, photography, and interactive media production and also serves as the school's technology liaison.

This award celebrates teachers and administrators who demonstrate outstanding leadership, as well as a passion for and commitment to educating the whole child; improving student engagement, achievement, and learning; and contributing to the education profession.

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Stephen Sroka

Tips from the Trenches: Administration

During the last few months, I have had the chance to talk with several speakers who strongly affected their audiences. I started to think about the remarkable leaders with whom I have worked over the years and how they have made huge differences with their incredible wisdom, insight, and actions. I contacted some of them and asked them to comment on working in education in these difficult times. I asked them to share some take-away messages, so that, if they were speaking, what would they want their audience to remember? Read the other installments in the series: school safety, student services, and teaching.

Leadership is essential to effective education. Here are some "Tips from the Trenches" from the school leaders and leaders of national education organizations themselves.

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Molly McCloskey

Best Questions: Someday Happens, Part Two

Four years ago on the inauguration of the first African American president of the United States, we titled our Whole Child Newsletter "Someday Happens," reflecting a T-shirt I saw at the ceremonies that day. Today, independent of political views, I'm wondering when someday will happen for the millions of kids promised a "free and appropriate public education." Although that phrase was first introduced in reference to children with disabilities, it applies too often to kids from all walks of life in all parts of the United States.

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