Tagged “Healthy”

Whole Child Symposium

A Matter of Choice

Post written by Walter McKenzie

Perfect Choice Logo CircuitWhat if I told you the answer to all that ails public education is choice? Not dollars. Not standardization. Not test scores. Choice. Surprisingly effective in its simplicity.

The current education equation is not simple by any stretch of the imagination and it doesn't reference choice nor children:

  • Education is a public enterprise funded by taxpayers.
  • Government reports to taxpayers on its performance.
  • Elected officials craft policy and practice in the name of accountability.

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Klea Scharberg

Whole Child Snapshots Provide State and National Pictures of Child Well-Being

ASCD Whole Child SnapshotsTo thrive in today's global society, children need personalized support, safe environments, good health, and challenging learning opportunities. Adequately preparing students for their future requires a more comprehensive approach to education that recognizes the crucial in-school factors and out-of-school influences that affect teaching and learning. Such an approach requires the collaboration and shared responsibility of families, schools, communities, and policymakers.

To support conversation, collaboration, and change, ASCD has released Whole Child Snapshots highlighting how well each U.S. state—and the nation—is meeting the comprehensive needs of its children. The snapshots feature data aligned with the five tenets of ASCD's Whole Child Initiative—healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged. Together, the data provide a fuller picture of child well-being that extends beyond standardized test scores. The snapshots also suggest initial ideas for how communities can make targeted and innovative improvements to support the whole child and help their students become college, career, and citizenship ready. To see each indicator and the full Whole Child Snapshot for each state, visit www.ascd.org/wholechildsnapshots.

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Whole Child Symposium

Today on the Whole Child Symposium Virtual: Classroom Instruction and Students

ASCD's inaugural Whole Child Symposium concludes this week with a series of virtual panels featuring school leaders, policy experts, teachers, and students. You can register, participate live, and join in the discussions on social media. Each panel will discuss what currently works in education, what we will need in the future to be successful, and how this can be accomplished.

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Whole Child Symposium

Today on the Whole Child Symposium Virtual: Education Policy and Schools

ASCD's inaugural Whole Child Symposium concludes this week with a series of virtual panels featuring school leaders, policy experts, teachers, and students. You can register, participate live, and join in the discussions on social media. Each panel will discuss what currently works in education, what we will need in the future to be successful, and how this can be accomplished.

Read more »

Whole Child Symposium

Symposium Focuses on Educating Young People for Their Future, Not Our Past

2014 Whole Child Symposium LiveWhole Child Symposium Live event at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. For three hours attendees—leading education leaders, U.S. congressional staff, and various ASCD constituents—listened to ASCD CEO and Executive Director Dr. Gene R. Carter and a panel of education experts discuss global education policies, processes, and practices and the influences on children, societies, and economies in the future. This discussion, led by ASCD Whole Child Programs Director Sean Slade, was focused more globally and on long-term problems, challenges, and solutions. Panelists addressed three key driving questions:

  • How will decisions made by policymakers today determine what our youth and societies become?
  • What do we as a society risk by abdicating the decision-making process or, at worst, not being aware that the wheels are in motion?
  • At a fundamental level, what do we want our youth, our children, and our societies to become, and what decisions must be made to get us there?

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Steven Weber

Not Worried About the EOG

Across the United States, students have started test prep. Students march through test packet after test packet with the goal of increasing test scores on a standardized test. In North Carolina, all elementary schools administer the End-of-Grade (EOG) Test. The test is a standardized test which measures how well students understand grade level standards.

What are the standards?

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Whole Child Symposium

Join the Whole Child Symposium: Tune In Today at Noon for Live Stream Event

2014 Whole Child Symposium#WCSymposium2014.

Looking at the theme "Choosing Your Tomorrow Today" from a global and long-term perspective, panelists will address

  • How decisions taken today by policymakers will determine what our youth and our societies become.
  • What we as a society risk by abdicating the decision-making process or, at worst, not being aware that the wheels are in motion.
  • At a fundamental level, what we want our youth, our children, and our societies to become—and what decisions must be made to get us there.

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Whole Child Symposium

ED Pulse Poll Results: What Is the Purpose of Education?

Post written by Kit Harris, ASCD Research

ASCD continually seeks to provide solutions to the challenges that face educators of all levels. A recent ASCD SmartBrief ED Pulse poll reached out to readers of the daily e-newsletter to share their views on the purpose of education.

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Eric Russo

Putting the Child into Whole Child: Give Students Voice to Improve Your Practice

Recently I was having a discussion with a colleague who is new to the building. This teacher is confident, self-assured, and has decades of experience more than me. We teach the same children, so we meet frequently for RTI and team meetings. This is the type of teacher that takes pride in being "old school," which roughly translates to a no-nonsense, quiet-equals-learning, behavior-should-have-negative-consequences type of environment. It's the model that many of us grew up with. Although I was able to navigate through this system because I was a so-called "good student," many friends were not particularly successful, with the logical assumption that they were "bad students." This model puts the system itself as the driving force for success, which is disempowering both to educators and to the students alike.

Now, the conversation in question did not go smoothly, especially when I insensitively insisted that the teacher "would not be successful" using this old school approach. Realizing that I was working against my goal, I quickly concluded with a final statement that I paraphrased from a Maya Angelou quote: People don't remember what you say; they remember how you made them feel. It is a statement that I share with staff and students, and for me it is at the foundation of the type of teacher I strive to be. It is also at the core of the safe and supported tenets of the whole child approach.

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Whole Child Symposium

Education Innovation: Teaching Tomorrow’s Learners

Post written by Mikaela Dwyer, a journalism student at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester. She considers herself a human rights activist and spends her time volunteering on campus and with various local nonprofits. After graduation, Dwyer hopes to join the Peace Corps and then become an investigative journalist for human rights issues.

Brian K. Perkins, director of the Urban Education Leadership Program at Columbia University Teachers College Department of Organization and Leadership, challenged his audience at the 2014 ASCD Annual Conference to think forward about what educators can do today for tomorrow's learners. He explained that innovation is key and reassured the audience that when he says "innovation," he does not mean "improvement." Improvement is just doing better what one is doing already. Innovation is a new solution to a new challenge.

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