Tagged “Nutrition”

Kristen Pekarek

September Is Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, obesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States. Research shows that childhood obesity puts kids at greater risk for health problems—including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease—and, once a child enters school, can undermine classroom and overall lifetime success. Encouraging new research indicates we are making some progress to reverse this epidemic: a new report on childhood obesity shows obesity among low-income preschoolers has declined slightly in 19 states and territories, and a new report on school health shows there have been improvements in the way we teach nutrition and physical activity in schools. But there is still a lot of work to be done.

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Kelli Windsor

Resilience Starts with School Breakfast

As kids head back to school, educators are focused on how to best ensure students succeed in the classroom and in life. That involves students being stronger, wiser, and more powerful. New findings from a national survey released by whole child partner Share Our Strength's No Kid Hungry campaign show that breakfast is key to academic success and ensuring resilience for students. The findings also show that rethinking how we serve school breakfast is crucial to enhancing the educational experience for all.

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Klea Scharberg

Reducing the Effects of Child Poverty

In today's global economic state, many families and children face reduced circumstances. The 2008 economic crisis became a "household crisis" (PDF) when higher costs for basic goods, fewer jobs and reduced wages, diminished assets and reduced access to credit, and reduced access to public goods and services affected families who coped, in part, by eating fewer and less nutritious meals, spending less on education and health care, and pulling children out of school to work or help with younger siblings. These "new poor" join those who were vulnerable prior to the financial shocks and economic downturn.

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Ruth Taylor

Healthy Eating: In Fulton Schools, It’s All About the Marketing

The Challenge

Placing attractive fruit bowls on the serving line, and prompting students to take one, is one of the many ways Fulton County School Nutrition is encouraging healthier food choices in the lunchroom.

The school nutrition program at Fulton County Schools in Atlanta, Georgia, already goes above and beyond U.S. federal nutrition standards, serving 50 percent whole grains and plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. The challenge was how to get to the next step: getting kids to actually select the healthy foods. After all, food isn't nutritious until it's eaten. The problem was not about changing menus or the food offered, as the menus and the food choices are already healthy. As area supervisor of Fulton County School Nutrition, my challenge was, how do we engage the students to want to eat healthfully? I believe it's about marketing the food.

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Pam Allyn

Field Notes: Raising Learning Warriors

Moses was my student in Brooklyn, N.Y. He came from Guyana, was 10 years old, and deaf. His mother, who spoke no English and knew no one in New York, had made the treacherous journey to the United States to give him the opportunity to go to school. He was the skinniest boy I had ever seen, with longer-than-long legs that he sometimes tripped over when he ran. Moses was not getting enough to eat at home, so I started bringing him food. Some days, he did not eat from the time he left me until the next morning at school.

Moses and his mother lived in one tiny room where the heat sometimes did not work. His mother worked two jobs and was rarely home for more than an hour when Moses returned from school. Yet here he was, at long last, in a school for the deaf where he could finally thrive and learn.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Summer Meals Programs Help Stretch Summertime Food Budgets

No Kid Hungry - Share Our Strength

Post written by Kim Caldwell with the No Kid Hungry Center for Best Practices

Teachers, parents, and kids tell us all the time that childhood hunger doesn't take a vacation during the summer months. That's because kids who normally get a lunch or breakfast at school lose access to those meals when class lets out for summer break. This loss of healthy school meals means, for some families, summertime can be a time of financial uncertainty.

New findings by Share Our Strength's No Kid Hungry campaign show that low-income families find it harder to make ends meet during summer months. In our national survey of 1,200 low-income families in the United States:

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Fred Ende

Exceeding Needs Through a Partnership Perspective

As a coordinator of science for a number of districts in the northern suburbs of New York City, I have the opportunity to work with schools with a tremendous array of needs. For some, finances are the primary culprit in educational challenges they face. In others, high populations of language learners or mobile student populations make it difficult to provide for each and every student. In still other cases, a combination of factors makes meeting student needs an uphill battle.

What's the common denominator? That every district, especially in today's educational climate, is facing drastic challenges. What's different is how districts and schools are dealing with those challenges. Are they embracing and working through them? Or are they brushed under the carpet, in hopes that "magical thinking" will take care of everything?

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Kumar Chandran

No Kid Hungry Starts with Breakfast

No Kid Hungry - Share Our Strength

More than 16 million children in the United States struggle with hunger, or one out of five kids. Teachers see this hunger firsthand in their classrooms. In a recent survey, three out of five K–8 public school teachers said they taught kids who regularly came to school hungry because they weren't getting enough to eat at home.

What if I told you that there was a solution? There is, and it's called school breakfast.

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Kristen Pekarek

National School Breakfast Week 2013

National School Breakfast Week

This week, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the School Nutrition Association are cosponsoring National School Breakfast Week!

Launched in 1989, the event is used to educate students, parents, and the community across the United States about the benefits of a healthy school breakfast. A recent study titled Ending Childhood Hunger: A Social Impact Analysis by whole child partner Share our Strength in collaboration with Deloitte, confirmed the benefits of a healthy, balanced breakfast at school—showing that school breakfasts are associated with positive, large-scale outcomes in education, economics, and health. This gives us even more reason to celebrate this week's events.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

No Child Should Grow Up Hungry

We are proud to welcome Share Our Strength as a whole child partner. Share Our Strength's No Kid Hungry campaign aims to end childhood hunger in the United States. It connects kids in need with nutritious food and teaches their families how to cook healthy, affordable meals. The campaign also engages the public to make ending childhood hunger a national priority.

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