Tagged “Parent And Family Engagement”

Barry Saide

Learn. Teach. Lead. This Time with Passion!

In order for me to lead effectively in my classroom, I needed to make sure I was teaching the right things. Otherwise, what were students learning? And, why were they learning it?

Students need to be personally invested in their learning in order for them to be most successful. What's taught needs to be relevant to them. The curriculum can be rigorous to the 10th power, but if it isn't taught in a way that is engaging and fun, students will not produce work that is reflective, vulnerable, risky, and potentially full of mistakes.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Community School Collaborations: A Lifeline for Early Learning Program Success

Post written by Janet Brown, Senior Early Childhood Program Specialist, and Kwesi Rollins, Director of Leadership Programs at the Institute for Educational Leadership

In Lifelines for Poor Children, economist and Nobel laureate James Heckman argues that quality early learning programs represent our best national education investment, due to evidence of societal benefits from longitudinal studies of Perry Preschool and Abecedarian early childhood programs.  

The Perry Preschool Project and Abecedarian programs worked extensively with families in their home and community contexts. Successes from such early learning and family support efforts suggest that cross-sector community collaborations, such as those in community schools, are ideal contexts for scaling up early childhood programming for low-income children and families. Such schools share program approaches with Perry Preschool and Abecedarian, including home visits and follow-up supports for children and families in their communities.

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Kit Harris, ASCD Research

ED Pulse Poll Results: What Is the Best Way to Communicate with Parents About the Common Core?

ASCD continually seeks to provide solutions to the challenges that face educators of all levels. Recently the ASCD SmartBrief ED Pulse poll addressed methods of educating parents about the Common Core State Standards.

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Melanie Olmstead

Redemption for Educators!

Educators may bear the brunt of school performance criticisms, but the public's opinion of educators is on the rise, with the majority of Americans believing that educators teach students well and keep them safe. More than 70 percent of Americans have trust and confidence in the men and women who teach in public schools, according to the 45th annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup poll (PDF) on the public's attitude toward public schools. Eighty-eight percent of parents feel their children are safe at school—the highest figure ever recorded by the poll—compared to the 66 percent who believe their children are safe playing in their neighborhood.

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Leader to Leader

A Generational Shift in the Value of Institutions

At the recent ASCD Leader to Leader (L2L) conference, attendees had a series of passionate unconference conversations. Several groups refined their thoughts into a series of presentations to share with other attendees in an "idea marketplace." During the idea marketplace, unconference groups presented for four rounds of 10-minute sessions, giving their peers the opportunity to learn from several groups in one session.

This post, written by Mike Rulon, a member of ASCD's Whole Child Faculty and facilitator for the Assessment for Learning ASCD Professional Interest Community, shares his group's experience. Join the conversation on Twitter by using the hashtag #ASCDL2L.

There has been a dramatic shift in young peoples' thinking about the value of institutions. For example, they are more comfortable with changing jobs; the research states that newcomers to the job market say they expect to change jobs about every three years. This is a drastic change in thinking from my generation. We believed that we would have one or two jobs in our lifetime and with the same company or school. We believed this idea represented stability and we found comfort in having our benefits and retirement secure.

At the L2L conference we discussed other shifts in thinking about the value of the institution of education. These points were made:

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Leader to Leader

Closing the Gaps Between Learners Through Relationships

At the recent ASCD Leader to Leader (L2L) conference, attendees had a series of passionate unconference conversations. Several groups refined their thoughts into a series of presentations to share with other attendees in an "idea marketplace." During the idea marketplace, unconference groups presented for four rounds of 10-minute sessions, giving their peers the opportunity to learn from several groups in one session.

This post, written by ASCD Affiliate leaders Sara Marcum (Arizona ASCD), Verneth Patterson (Bahamas ASCD), Kym Stein (Iowa ASCD), and Angeline Savard (Ontario ASCD); ASCD Emerging Leader Torian White; ASCD Student Chapter leader Melissa Getz (Pennsylvania State University at Harrisburg); ASCD Whole Child Network school leaders Evangeline Iglesias and John Wesolowski (Guam); and ASCD Faculty Molly Bensinger-Lacy and Alicia Monroe share their group's experience. Join the conversation on Twitter by using the hashtag #ASCDL2L.

During the idea marketplace at ASCD's L2L conference, our group's conversation focused on closing the gap between the "haves" and the "have-nots." The power of this conversation emerged from a common advocacy for all students and the reality that, regardless of educational context, we all serve those who possess resources and those who have limited resources. Some examples of these resources shared by participants include

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Kevin Scott

Who Says Book Clubs Are Just for Moms?

I was honored to host the most recent Whole Child Podcast where we talked about ways we reflect, recharge, and refresh as educators. One theme present in the podcast discussion and one we hear about over and over again is reading. While we encourage students (of all ages) to read often, as adults we find it difficult to find the time to read between full-time jobs, raising our children, and, heaven forbid, our own hobbies.

Summer seems to be a time where things slow down a bit. But I find that even as I write that sentence, I'm glancing at my calendar for the next meeting, what camp my kids are in this week, and what time I need to get them so they can go to the next activity. So maybe summer is a time where things don't necessarily slow down, but the schedule changes.

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Mary E. Walsh

Support All Students to Close the Achievement Gap

City Connects

More than 16 million children in the United States live in poverty, which dramatically affects their ability to come to school ready to learn and thrive. The latest data from the National Center for Education Statistics' The Condition of Education 2013 (PDF) report shows that one in five schools was considered high poverty in 2011, an increase from one in eight schools in 2000.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Take Action: Support Effective Professional Development and Evaluation

The Effective Teaching and Leading Act (S. 1063) was recently introduced by United States Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), and we need your help in getting your Senators to support it! The bill would help ensure that teachers and principals are effectively trained, mentored, developed, and evaluated through proven, team-based professional development strategies.

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Klea Scharberg

Reducing the Effects of Child Poverty

In today's global economic state, many families and children face reduced circumstances. The 2008 economic crisis became a "household crisis" (PDF) when higher costs for basic goods, fewer jobs and reduced wages, diminished assets and reduced access to credit, and reduced access to public goods and services affected families who coped, in part, by eating fewer and less nutritious meals, spending less on education and health care, and pulling children out of school to work or help with younger siblings. These "new poor" join those who were vulnerable prior to the financial shocks and economic downturn.

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