Tagged “Personalized Learning”

Podcast Whole Child Podcast

Culturally Relevant Teaching: How Do We Create Equitable Learning Environments?

Students enter the classroom with their own specific learning needs, styles, abilities, and preferences. They also bring with them their own cultures, backgrounds, and personal histories. In culturally responsive classrooms, teachers make standards-based content and curricula accessible to students and teach in a way that students can understand from their varying cultural perspectives. If the goal is for each student to succeed academically, how are we using the cultural capital available in our classrooms to capture attentions, engage students, and make curricula relevant?

On this episode of the Whole Child Podcast, Sean Slade, ASCD's director of whole child programs, and guests explore what it means to, as Gloria Ladson-Billings writes, "empower students intellectually, socially, emotionally, and politically by using cultural referents to impart knowledge, skills, and attitudes"; how to create a positive classroom learning community; and what supports teachers need to serve their diverse students.

Listen to the episode below or download.

Panelists

  • Paul Gorski is an associate professor in New Century College and research fellow in the Center for the Advancement of Well-Being at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, and founder of EdChange. His work and passion is social justice activism and areas of scholarly focus include anti-poverty activism and education, economic justice, racial justice, environmental justice, and animal rights. Gorski's most recent book, coauthored with Seema Pothini, is Case Studies on Diversity and Social Justice Education. He is also the coauthor, with Katy Swalwell, of the March 2015 Educational Leadership article "Equity Literacy for All." Connect with Gorski on Twitter @pgorski.
  • Andrew Miller has spent many years in education as a classroom teacher, online teacher, curriculum developer, instructional coach, teacher leader, and education consultant. He has used his skills in authentic intellectual work, online education, project-based learning, game-based learning/gamification, 21st century skills, and culturally responsive teaching to create engaging learning environments for all students. Miller currently serves as a faculty member for the Buck Institute for Education and ASCD. He is also an avid blogger and writes regularly for Inservice, Edutopia, and the Huffington Post on the subjects of student engagement, formative assessment, the Common Core State Standards, project-based learning, and technology integration. Connect with Miller on Twitter @betamiller.

In a special one-on-one conversation, Slade spoke with Geneva Gay, an educational researcher who has contributed significantly to the progression of culturally relevant teaching. Gay is a professor of education at the University of Washington in Seattle, where she teaches multicultural education and general curriculum theory. She is nationally and internationally known for her scholarship in multicultural education, particularly as it relates to curriculum design, staff development, classroom instruction, and intersections of culture, race, ethnicity, teaching, and learning. She has written a number of books and book chapters, including the book Culturally Responsive Teaching: Theory, Research, and Practice, and is a member of the authorship team for the Scott Foresman New Elementary Social Studies Series.

How can teachers make their classrooms and instruction safe and effective for students from a wide range of backgrounds?

Klea Scharberg

Flipped Learning: Gateway to Student Engagement

Flip Your Classroom - ISTE & ASCDFlip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day, in a free webinar to learn how the flipped classroom model can help teachers gain more face-to-face time with students, foster real differentiated or personalized learning, and challenge students to take responsibility for their learning.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014, 3:00 p.m. eastern time
Register now!

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Homework in a Flipped Classroom

ASCD author Aaron Sams explains how flipped classrooms use class time to practice and apply skills learned during prerecorded lectures. Homework becomes classwork, and lectures and other content traditionally presented during class time are viewed outside of class, at home, on a personal device, or in a school-based resource room.

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Whole Child Symposium

Self-Selecting, Real-World Learning Communities

Post written by Walter McKenzie

Imagine in your mind, a map of your community. Nothing detailed; just the boundaries and general lay of the land. Got it? Now add in the major areas in your community where people live and work and play. You know, to give yourself some bearings with a few landmarks. Still with me? Good! Now convert this mental image into a heat map. You know, where the hot spots flare up in bright yellows, oranges and reds? Picture in your mind hot spots that indicate places people go to learn new things and practice skills that are important to them. Where are those heat surges? Athletic fields? Dance studios? Book stores? Parks and beaches? Art galleries? Theaters? How about school buildings? No? Why aren’t school building hot spots on anyone's heat map?

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Klea Scharberg

FIT Teaching: The Tool Kit for High-Quality Teaching and Learning

FIT Teaching: The Tool Kit for High-Quality Teaching and Learning - ASCD Summer AcademyGet hands-on practice using the new FIT Teaching (Framework for Intentional and Targeted Teaching®) tool kit to help ensure high-quality teaching and learning. Join ASCD authors Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey in a free webinar on June 4 to learn more.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014, 4:30 p.m. eastern time
Register now!

The synergy of all the tools in a teacher's tool kit is what makes for high-quality instruction. Based on the work of Fisher and Frey, the FIT Teaching® tool kit provides teachers with these tools and skills around four essential elements to help ensure high-quality teaching and learning in every classroom. The essential elements are:

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Whole Child Symposium

A Matter of Choice

Post written by Walter McKenzie

Perfect Choice Logo CircuitWhat if I told you the answer to all that ails public education is choice? Not dollars. Not standardization. Not test scores. Choice. Surprisingly effective in its simplicity.

The current education equation is not simple by any stretch of the imagination and it doesn't reference choice nor children:

  • Education is a public enterprise funded by taxpayers.
  • Government reports to taxpayers on its performance.
  • Elected officials craft policy and practice in the name of accountability.

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Andrew Miller

The Missing Piece of Personalization: Passion and Engagement

Personalization is quickly becoming a buzzword in education, especially in terms of blended learning and educational technology. I joined a team of educators on a panel on the same subject on the Whole Child Podcast. We unpacked what it is and what it might look like in the classroom. We talked about its challenges and benefits and collaborated to explain its implications for education. Most importantly, we talked about the critical role of relationships.

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Eric Russo

Putting the Child into Whole Child: Give Students Voice to Improve Your Practice

Recently I was having a discussion with a colleague who is new to the building. This teacher is confident, self-assured, and has decades of experience more than me. We teach the same children, so we meet frequently for RTI and team meetings. This is the type of teacher that takes pride in being "old school," which roughly translates to a no-nonsense, quiet-equals-learning, behavior-should-have-negative-consequences type of environment. It's the model that many of us grew up with. Although I was able to navigate through this system because I was a so-called "good student," many friends were not particularly successful, with the logical assumption that they were "bad students." This model puts the system itself as the driving force for success, which is disempowering both to educators and to the students alike.

Now, the conversation in question did not go smoothly, especially when I insensitively insisted that the teacher "would not be successful" using this old school approach. Realizing that I was working against my goal, I quickly concluded with a final statement that I paraphrased from a Maya Angelou quote: People don't remember what you say; they remember how you made them feel. It is a statement that I share with staff and students, and for me it is at the foundation of the type of teacher I strive to be. It is also at the core of the safe and supported tenets of the whole child approach.

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Whole Child Symposium

Imagine Today’s Children at 25

"What do we want our children to be like? Think of that child, that teenager, that young adult and describe them. What words do we use? ... What do our children want to be like when they are 25? How would they describe themselves? Are they content with an education system which at times seems more designed to sort, test, and label students than develop, educate, or prepare them?"

—"In Support of the Whole Child," The Huffington Post, 2012

We live in a global economy that requires our students to be prepared to think both critically and creatively, evaluate massive amounts of information, solve complex problems, and communicate well. A strong foundation in reading, writing, math, and other core subjects is still as important as ever, yet by itself is insufficient for lifelong success. For too long, we have committed to time structures, coursework, instructional methods, and assessments designed more than a century ago. Our current definition of student success is too narrow. It is time to put students first, align resources to students’ multiple needs, and advocate for a more balanced approach.

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Whole Child Symposium

What Do You Think We Need from Education?

As we continue our discussions on "Choosing Your Tomorrow Today" and "The Future of Schooling" as part of ASCD's Whole Child Symposium, let's add another question to ponder: What do you think we need from education?

In the United States, historically, the purpose of education has evolved according to the needs of society. Education's primary purpose has ranged from instructing youth in religious doctrine, to preparing them to live in a democracy, to assimilating immigrants into mainstream society, to preparing workers for the industrialized 20th century workplace.

And now, as educators prepare young people for their futures in a world that is rapidly changing, what is the goal? To create adults who can compete in a global economy? To create lifelong learners? To create emotionally healthy adults who can engage in meaningful relationships?

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