Tagged “Reading And Literacy”

ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

History for Its Own Sake, and For All of Our Sakes

Post written by Kerry Dunne and Christopher Martell

Recent national media attention on attempts by school districts to fold history and social studies into broader humanities programs has brought attention to the role of history education in today schools.

This begs the question: Is the study of history and the social studies a critical part of a 21st century education? In the age of a Common Core State Standards curriculum dominated by literacy and numeracy, will it survive as a core school subject? We argue that high-quality teaching and learning in history, geography, economics, and civics matter more than ever for today's American students and for the future of the country.

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Klea Scharberg

Digitally Speaking: Creating Exceptional Podcasts, Videos, and More with Erik Palmer

ASCD Summer Boot Camp Webinar SeriesTeaching the Core Skills of Listening and Speaking, for an exciting, free webinar to learn how you can use digital tools in your classroom to develop competent communicators.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014, 3:00 p.m. eastern time
Register now!

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Becoming Better Listeners

Post written by Melinda Moran

At its heart, differentiation is about knowing your students—not only where they are relative to learning goals, but also who they are as learners, or better yet, as people. Because our students are really people "under construction," differentiation is most successful when we continually update our notions of who our kids are.

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Klea Scharberg

Free Webinar—Read, Write, Lead: Breakthrough Strategies for Schoolwide Literacy Success

Regie RoutmanJoin respected educator and ASCD author Regie Routman for an exciting, free webinar to learn how to increase reading and writing achievement, engagement, and enjoyment for all students, including English language learners and students who struggle.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 3:00 p.m. eastern time
Register now!

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Tisha Shipley

Planning Engaging Lessons Using Children’s Literature

In a world of test-driven instruction, teachers are still expected to have effective teaching strategies and teach children to love reading. It is very important that we as professionals take a look at how we introduce reading to children; what strategies we use to teach them to love reading; and how we can make it fun, engaging, and meaningful. This article discusses teaching objectives, skills that must be taught, and how they can be organized and successfully implemented by using children's literature. You may have to get a little creative, but creativity makes lessons engaging and worthwhile!

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Supporting Readers in Science

Post written by Sarah Carlson, Deni Basaraba, Gina Biancarosa, and Lina Shanley

When most people think about reading in science, they think of heavy and densely written texts—the kind you find in science textbooks. Although textbooks remain a staple of science education, they—along with laboratory notes and scholarly reports—are notably lacking from the exemplar science texts referenced in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Rather, the Common Core exemplars include excerpts from articles in popular science magazines, manuals, procedural texts, and (at the high school level) primary-source documents (for example, an excerpt from a translation of Euclid's Elements).

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

How We Know Kids Living in Poverty Can Meet the Common Core Standards

The Common Core State Standards underscore five key shifts in teaching and learning that place greater emphasis on

  1. Critical thinking, reasoning, and use of evidence to defend an argument.
  2. Deeper conceptual understanding, particularly in math.
  3. Writing, not only through explicit standards for writing, but also through the need to communicate one's reasoning through writing.
  4. Applying learning to real-world situations.
  5. Using informational texts to build content knowledge and literacy.

The shifts embodied in the standards necessitate that students become self-regulating, metacognitive learners. And for each shift, a body of research points toward pedagogies that are particularly effective in helping students who live in poverty meet and achieve the skills, knowledge, and dispositions embodied in the shifts. The brief descriptions below describe these research-based approaches in relationship to a particular shift; however, many of these approaches could apply to more than one shift. The purpose is not to "sell" or promote a particular approach, but rather to illuminate the large volume of evidence that can challenge our mind-sets about students from low-income families and their ability to learn to high standards.

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Tisha Shipley

Early Childhood Education: Implementing Developmentally Appropriate Practices into Literacy Instruction

A top priority for early childhood educators is to teach children to read. Using developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) while incorporating foundational concepts into lessons help teachers differentiate instruction, engage students in the learning process, and increase achievement of all children. While students are treated as unique individuals, all practices should be appropriate to the child's age and developmental stage and build on previously taught concepts. The purpose of this article is to explore teachers' experiences as they implement DAP into their literacy instruction. It also examines obstacles they face as they implement their practices.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

2013 Best of the Blog: 20–16

In the past year, experts and practitioners in the field, whole child partners, and ASCD staff have shared their stories, ideas, and resources to help you ensure that each child, in each school, in each community is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged and prepared for success in higher education, employment, and civic life.

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Cara Schrack

Daily, Simple Ways to Support Learning

It's hard to believe that the trees are just about absent of leaves and the school year is well under way. As a parent of a 3-year-old, I spend time talking about the change of seasons as we listen to the sound of the leaves as they crunch beneath our feet. My husband and I take any opportunity that comes our way to explain the world around our son to help prepare him for his future in school and life. In essence, this is a nice comparison to the intent of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

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