Tagged “Reflection And Planning”

Podcast Whole Child Podcast

Reflective Teachers Are More Effective: Improvement Doesn’t Happen by Accident

Teachers that are more reflective are more effective in the classroom. The difference between learning a skill and being able to implement it effectively resides in our capacity to engage in deep, continuous thought about that skill. In other words, recognizing why we do something is often more important than knowing how to do it. Reflective practitioners are intentional in their actions, accurately assess their impact, adjust their actions on-the-fly, and engage in ongoing reflection.

On this episode of the Whole Child Podcast, we explore how to develop and grow our capacity for success through self-reflection and its impact on student learning, the quality of our schools, and the state of our profession.

Listen to the episode below or download here.

Panelists

  • Kim Price has been a teacher for 15 years and has only worked in Title 1 schools. Currently she is teaching 5th grade at Sun Valley Elementary School in Reno, Nevada. Connect with Price on Twitter @thisteacherocks.
  • Alisa Simeral is a school turnaround specialist and veteran educator who has guided school-based reform efforts as a teacher, dean, and instructional coach. Her emphasis is, and always has been, improving the adult-input factors that contribute to the betterment of the student-output results. Simeral partnered with Pete Hall to write two ASCD books together, Building Teachers' Capacity for Success: A Collaborative Approach for Coaches and School Leaders (2008) and Teach, Reflect, Learn: Building Your Capacity for Success in the Classroom (2015). Passionate about providing support where it's needed most—at the classroom level—her mantra is "When our teachers succeed, our students succeed." Connect with Simeral on Twitter @AlisaSimeral.
  • Pete Hall is a veteran school administrator and professional development agent who has dedicated his career to supporting the improvement of our education systems. Besides partnering with Alisa Simeral on two books together, he authored The First-Year Principal (Scarecrow Education, 2004) and Lead On! Motivational Lessons for School Leaders (Eye on Education, 2011). Hall currently works as an educational consultant as a member of the ASCD Faculty and trains educators worldwide. Connect with Hall on Twitter @EducationHall.

Good thinking doesn't happen without practice. What are your habits of reflection?

Klea Scharberg

How Did You Reflect and Recharge This Summer?

Summer for educators is often a time to look back on the past year—and look forward to the coming one. What worked, what didn't, and what will you change? Educating the whole child and planning for comprehensive, sustainable school improvement requires us to be "whole educators" who take the time to recharge, reflect, and reinvigorate.

Last summer the Whole Child Podcast highlighted educators' need to reflect, refresh, and recharge. ASCD's Kevin Scott was joined by ASCD Emerging Leader Program alumni Peter Badalament, principal of Concord-Carlisle High School in Massachusetts, and Jason Flom, director-elect at Cornerstone Learning Community in Florida where he was a founding teacher of the elementary school, to discuss their strategies for reflection.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Survival Tips for New Principals

Post written by Ashley Allen, a master's student in communication management with an emphasis on marketing at the University of Southern California. She received her bachelor's degree from San Jose State University last spring and hopes to use her writing skills to make a difference.

Susan Kessler, April Snodgrass, and Andrew Davis of Nashville (Tenn.) Public Schools discussed the struggles of being a new principal and shared valuable insight for surviving the first year during their 2014 ASCD Annual Conference session "When Do You Sleep: Surviving the First Year as a Principal." The dynamic trio each shared tips that have played an integral part in their own success.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Reflect or Refract: Top 3 Tips for the Reflective Educator

Post written by Barry Saide and Jasper Fox, Sr.

The dictionary definition of reflection states that reflection is light bouncing off a flat plane and returning back at the same angle. This allows us to see an image clearly, like when looking in a mirror. Reflection is an almost perfect representation. If the light bends prior to it returning, it's called refraction. What was once a perfect view becomes hazy, the representation distorted.

When applying these terms to education, how often do we reflect vs. refract?

Reflecting on our own pedagogy and practice takes a confident mindset. We need to be secure with ourselves in order to be open to honest feedback from others, admit mistakes made during delivery of instruction, and self-identify possible solutions for why things didn't go as planned. Reflectors do not blame students for their inattentiveness or behavioral issues. They identify ways to maintain consistent engagement and involvement throughout the learning process. If many students do not get the correct answer, the default response of a reflective teacher is not to state: "I don't know why they didn't get it—I taught it!" Instead, the reflective teacher reviews their approach to teaching the concept, and will try a new approach the next day. Reflectors know not all students understand content delivered the first time because reflective teachers are lifelong students, and may not have grasped content presented to them at some point, too.

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Kevin Scott

It’s the End of the Year as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)

My oldest son is ending his elementary school career this week and I've been taking some time to reflect on his life and on my experiences as a teacher and educator. The end of year celebrations are a huge time drain and struggle as a teacher, but as a parent, it's one of the few times we are able to peek into the world own kids live in on a daily basis.

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Klea Scharberg

Insights on Making a Difference

Making a Difference - ASCD Educational LeadershipTeachers work every day for the benefit of their students. Learn how other educators make a difference in students' lives and learning in a special summer issue of Educational Leadership and get inspired. This digital issue gives you instant access to stories about individuals, teams, schools, and even a U.S. state that are passionate about teaching and learning.

In her "Perspectives" column, Editor-in-Chief Marge Scherer reminds us to remember why we do what we do. She writes,

With so much energy devoted all year long to tackling problems, summer can be a good time to recall why you went into education in the first place, reflect on your many accomplishments, and think about the good you have done and will do in your life as an educator. It's not about self-congratulation, but about looking inside yourself for the rejuvenation and answers only you can find.

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Kevin Parr

End-of-Year Reflection: Think About the Whole Child

As the school year winds down, teachers are spending as much time reflecting on the past year as they are thinking about a summer filled with sit-down lunches, obligation-free evenings and weekends, and restful nights without dreaming about school.

Throughout the year teachers reflect continuously on particular interactions with students, a given lesson, or even a whole school day because they realize it is the key to improving their practice. At the end of the year, however, teachers should take time reflect on how things went overall to set themselves and their students up for success next year. Without a framework to guide teachers, reflecting on the entire school year can easily turn into spiraling self-talk with few results other than "this was the worst year ever" or "this was the best year ever." Nevertheless, teachers can engage in focused reflection that will truly help them to better meet the needs of the kids they will meet in September.

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Celina Brennan

Personalized Professional Development Elements: Supporting the CCSS Transition

Personalized learning has proven effective for empowering students to monitor their learning, establish goals, and reflect on progress. As the the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) have become a target of focus for educators, we must consider how we are embarking on this learning journey as adults. Providing a professional atmosphere for personalized learning is essential in supporting teachers through the CCSS transition.

Each educator brings forth a unique background based on professional style, years of experience, and depth of CCSS understanding. As learners embracing this educational mind-shift, we each inevitably need something different as we engage in trainings and conversations related to the CCSS. Our learning experiences should not be a one-size-fits-all approach. Nor should professional development send us into information overload. As learners, we should be inspired to interact with the knowledge and perspective of the CCSS in order to find our own place within the transition.

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Barry Saide

Learn. Teach. Lead. This Time with Passion!

In order for me to lead effectively in my classroom, I needed to make sure I was teaching the right things. Otherwise, what were students learning? And, why were they learning it?

Students need to be personally invested in their learning in order for them to be most successful. What's taught needs to be relevant to them. The curriculum can be rigorous to the 10th power, but if it isn't taught in a way that is engaging and fun, students will not produce work that is reflective, vulnerable, risky, and potentially full of mistakes.

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Tina Byland

A Commitment to Educating the Whole Child: Inservice Roundup

Here at ASCD, the Whole Child Initiative drives our daily work—regardless of what our job descriptions entail. As a former teacher, I am particularly devoted to supporting the whole child and ensuring the safety and health of every student I encounter. Keeping the whole child in mind, I post content for ASCD's Inservice blog that consistently reflects our commitment to fostering a healthy, safe, engaging, supportive, and challenging environment for students.

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