Tagged “Resilience”

Jessica Bohn

Turning Resistant Teachers into Resilient Teachers

Resistant teachers can have a profound effect on the school climate and culture in both positive and negative ways. In the book Leading in a Culture of Change (2007), Michael Fullan says resisters deserve respect both because they present ideas we might otherwise miss and because their influence is crucial to navigating the politics of implementation. By using situational leadership, the ability to fluidly interchange among a variety of leadership styles as the situation demands, administrators can shape teacher resistance into resilience and develop powerful partners in school initiatives. Goleman (2004) says situational leadership can mitigate the negative and enhance the positive forces influencing school climate. Effective school leaders know when to use a different leadership approach based on the behaviors and personalities of their teachers.

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Sara Truebridge

Educating The New Humanity: Educating Beyond 21st Century Skills

Parents are faced with an enormous task in raising today's child. The increasing economic burdens, the changing family structure, the additional demands on time, and the concerns of a safe environment all contribute to the challenge of raising a child.

As society has become more complex and parents' roles are challenged, so too are the roles of teachers.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

2013 Best of the Blog: 10–6

In the past year, experts and practitioners in the field, whole child partners, and ASCD staff have shared their stories, ideas, and resources to help you ensure that each child, in each school, in each community is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged and prepared for success in higher education, employment, and civic life.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

2013 Best of the Blog: 20–16

In the past year, experts and practitioners in the field, whole child partners, and ASCD staff have shared their stories, ideas, and resources to help you ensure that each child, in each school, in each community is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged and prepared for success in higher education, employment, and civic life.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Letter to the Editor: The Secret Ingredient to Building Resilience in Children

Resilience and Learning - ASCD Educational LeadershipDear Editor,

The following is a response to the excellent articles in a recent issue of ASCD's Educational Leadership magazine. I am a Montessori school principal living and working in Sydney, Australia, over the past 17 years. I am a long-term ASCD member and have worked as a teacher in schools with primarily non-English speaking migrant families, as a counsellor and principal in an international school where kidnapping and terrorism directly affected a number of families, and headed a highly academic school where the majority of students continued studies outside of school every day of the week. My current position has brought me to a place of understanding of education I had never been able to reach before, despite the diverse environments in which I served earlier. While no school is free of difficulties, I write this response after finding the "secret ingredient" in building resilience in children.

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Dianna Minor

Maintaining Resilience in Education

Resilience in education is best developed in the early grades when students' interests are keen and easiest to develop. This is often the time when a teacher can best motivate a child to believe she can do anything if she tries and puts forth her best efforts. Resilience is the ongoing process of building a child's motivation and drive to excel when met with difficult or challenging circumstances. It is that intrinsic force which guides a child's thinking and produces a "can do" attitude.

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Start Empathy

Empathy and Racism

Post written by Madeleine Rogin for Ashoka's Start Empathy Initiative, a whole child partner organization.

Leading education theorists, such as Howard Gardner and Tony Wagner, have written about the importance of cultivating our students' abilities to communicate across "networks"—skills that are crucial to success in our new global reality. And indeed, there's already been a popular acceptance that teaching around the topics of race, racism, and communicating across differences is an essential part of education in the 21st century. But in many classroom conversations, racism is framed as something of the past rather than a present reality. In addition, white children often think of slavery or the Jim Crow laws as something horrific that happened to "them," but do not see these events as something that is bad for "us" as a whole. To avoid this mistake, we can focus on empathy in the classroom as a way to prevent exclusionary behavior and "othering," which may move students to stand up against bias and prejudice.

Looking toward the future, the next step is to ask ourselves, as educators and parents, how do we go about these conversations in a way that promotes values such as inclusivity and empathy?

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Pet Pals: Teaching Resilience With Man’s Best Friend

Dogs are amazing creatures! They provide unconditional love, do not discriminate, judge, laugh, or criticize, and they are excellent and attentive listeners. They encourage relaxation, lower blood pressure, and brighten affect. These characteristics help to make pet-assisted therapy a natural fit for children and adolescents, and students in North Carolina's Orange County Schools will happily agree!

One of the first pet-assisted therapy programs in schools, R.E.A.D. (Reading Education Assistance Dogs) focuses on reading and was introduced several years ago in the west by Intermountain Therapy Animals. The concept spread throughout the country and there are now a variety of programs and models that work with children at school and in libraries (See Spot Read, Tail-Wagging Tutors, etc.). Pets are now being used in many ways in education settings and even help to relax students studying for exams at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Mindful Practices

Resilience: It’s a Practice

Post written by Carla Tantillo and Lara Veon, Mindful Practices

Among the most heartbreaking moments as an educator is that of observing a student who doesn't believe in herself and sees a mistake—be it a social interaction gone bad or a failing grade—as a fracture of character instead of an opportunity for growth. Similarly upsetting is witnessing a student who experiences trauma and loss withdraw or act out in unpredictable and often disruptive behavior.

At moments like these resilience often seems an inconsistent trait. However, similarly to other social-emotional skills, the practice of helping students cultivate resilience can indeed be taught. It needn't occur in isolation and it should be taught with a whole child approach. Below are five strategies for integrating resiliency development into your classroom:

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Ashanti Foster

PEACE at Oxon Hill Middle School

As kings and queens arrive at school, they are greeted with warm smiles, hand shakes, and student-initiated hugs to staff members and one another. They can't wait to get to school! It is clear that PEACE (Positive Energy Activates Constant Elevation) lives here. "Peace King, Peace Queen." Here it seems that positive energy activates constant elevation.

Situated in Ft. Washington, Md., is Oxon Hill Middle School, where the campus serves kings and queens that represent varied family lifestyles. Some students arrive in wheelchairs, others with limited English proficiency. In order to promote relationship building, creative instructional and support practices are in place so that every student and every parent knows how important their success is to the school. The way in which adult educators acknowledge students' capacity to learn and grow is the fabric of improving teaching and learning. Teachers greet students at the door each module, each day. Parents visit the school on an open door policy and students know exactly what to do and where to go if they have a concern. Each staff member addresses the work they do as an act of service and for that reason student learning is the motivation in all they do.

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