Tagged “Safe”

Klea Scharberg

Digitally Speaking: Creating Exceptional Podcasts, Videos, and More with Erik Palmer

ASCD Summer Boot Camp Webinar SeriesTeaching the Core Skills of Listening and Speaking, for an exciting, free webinar to learn how you can use digital tools in your classroom to develop competent communicators.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014, 3:00 p.m. eastern time
Register now!

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Laura Varlas

Turning Around the Teen Brain by Building Effort

Neuroplasticity means humans have the ability to change their brains through repeated, adaptive practice. Buy-in, however, can be a huge hurdle in getting students to invest effort in the actions that will grow their brains.

"If the brain's not buying in, then it's not changing," author Eric Jensen noted in his 2014 ASCD Annual Conference session, "Turnaround Tools for the Teenage Brain."

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Becoming Better Listeners

Post written by Melinda Moran

At its heart, differentiation is about knowing your students—not only where they are relative to learning goals, but also who they are as learners, or better yet, as people. Because our students are really people "under construction," differentiation is most successful when we continually update our notions of who our kids are.

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Whole Child Symposium

Equity: The Driver for School Improvement?

What will drive school improvement in the future? Some believe that it will be choice—ensuring that students have choice in what and how they learn; allowing teachers to have greater autonomy in the classroom; and, possibly, providing families expanded choice of schools.

For others the key driver may be ensuring equity. Proponents argue that the biggest barrier to effective education is equity of resources and opportunities. Pasi Sahlberg, currently a visiting professor at Harvard University and the former director general for the Centre for International Mobility and Cooperation (CIMO) in Helsinki, has made the case that Finland's meteoric rise has been as a result of a focus on equity, and that this has been consistent across the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) high performers (Korea, Canada, and Japan).

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Mary E. Walsh

Impacting Academic Achievement Through Student Support

City ConnectsFifteen years ago, a small team of school, university, and community partners began working on creating the system of student support that is now City Connects. We were hopeful that we would be able to demonstrate that addressing students' out-of-school needs would lead to improvements in academic achievement and student well-being.

Developed at Boston College's Lynch School of Education in the late 90s, City Connects is a student support intervention that addresses the non-academic factors like homelessness or hunger that can limit academic achievement, especially for children living in poverty. The intervention identifies the strengths and needs of every child across academic, social/emotional, health, and family domains and connects each student to a tailored set of prevention, intervention, and enrichment services available in the community and/or school.

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Kevin Scott

It’s the End of the Year as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)

My oldest son is ending his elementary school career this week and I've been taking some time to reflect on his life and on my experiences as a teacher and educator. The end of year celebrations are a huge time drain and struggle as a teacher, but as a parent, it's one of the few times we are able to peek into the world own kids live in on a daily basis.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Why Did You Become a Teacher?

Ask educators why they went into teaching, and the majority will respond that they wanted to make a difference in the lives of young people. In this video, ASCD authors and leaders Robyn Jackson, Baruti Kafele, Doug Fisher, Jeffrey Benson, Michael Ford, Myron Dueck, and Eric Sheninger explain why they became educators.

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Klea Scharberg

Insights on Making a Difference

Making a Difference - ASCD Educational LeadershipTeachers work every day for the benefit of their students. Learn how other educators make a difference in students' lives and learning in a special summer issue of Educational Leadership and get inspired. This digital issue gives you instant access to stories about individuals, teams, schools, and even a U.S. state that are passionate about teaching and learning.

In her "Perspectives" column, Editor-in-Chief Marge Scherer reminds us to remember why we do what we do. She writes,

With so much energy devoted all year long to tackling problems, summer can be a good time to recall why you went into education in the first place, reflect on your many accomplishments, and think about the good you have done and will do in your life as an educator. It's not about self-congratulation, but about looking inside yourself for the rejuvenation and answers only you can find.

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Walter McKenzie

No Planned Obsolescence in Education

We are a nation of makers and consumers. And in this free market culture, value is king and the art of the bargain is most prized. It's a conundrum: you get what you pay for, but no one wants to pay full price. In every transaction, let the buyer beware!

So let me ask you this. Would you sink money into a car without dashboard displays? Would you buy a house with no electrical wiring or plumbing? How about a mobile device with no wireless capability? Yes I know; ridiculous examples. But follow me here...

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Gaming in the Classroom Can Be an Epic Win

Post written by Mikaela Dwyer, a journalism student at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester. She considers herself a human rights activist and spends her time volunteering on campus and with various local nonprofits. After graduation, Dwyer hopes to join the Peace Corps and then become an investigative journalist for human rights issues.

Jane McGonigal - 2014 ASCD Annual ConferenceResearch has proven that children who play games have the opportunity to become great creative and critical thinkers as well as quick problem solvers, resourceful engineers, and empathetic individuals. For years, however, the media has tried to convince parents and educators that gaming is a way to escape real-life problems and a real waste of time. Jane McGonigal, game designer and author of Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World, held a session at the 2014 ASCD Annual Conference advocating that gaming can be an incredibly positive thing. It is our responsibility as the adults and role models in the children's lives, however, to focus on the benefits of gaming when talking to them.

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