Tagged “School Breakfast”

Brittany Mascio, NElovesPS

Bringing Health and Wellness Back to School

Nebraska Loves Public Schools - NElovesPS - The Whole ChildThis week many schools across the Midwest will flow back into their daily classroom routines and students will start adjusting from the freedom of summer to the structure of study. That means plenty of grab-and-go school breakfasts, packed lunches, coveted afterschool snacks with outdoor recess, and brain breaks in the classroom sure to follow. The school day will soon resume its role as one of the largest influencers in a child's day to embrace and model health and wellness practices.

In interviewing for our film The Whole Child, we discovered that incorporating healthy lifestyle supports into student life directly relates to classroom performance—a healthier student is a student better equipped for learning. But, as we've found, oftentimes there are barriers for students to become fit and focused—mentally and physically—and it becomes the school and the school community's responsibility to step in.

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Eric Russo

Putting the Child into Whole Child: Give Students Voice to Improve Your Practice

Recently I was having a discussion with a colleague who is new to the building. This teacher is confident, self-assured, and has decades of experience more than me. We teach the same children, so we meet frequently for RTI and team meetings. This is the type of teacher that takes pride in being "old school," which roughly translates to a no-nonsense, quiet-equals-learning, behavior-should-have-negative-consequences type of environment. It's the model that many of us grew up with. Although I was able to navigate through this system because I was a so-called "good student," many friends were not particularly successful, with the logical assumption that they were "bad students." This model puts the system itself as the driving force for success, which is disempowering both to educators and to the students alike.

Now, the conversation in question did not go smoothly, especially when I insensitively insisted that the teacher "would not be successful" using this old school approach. Realizing that I was working against my goal, I quickly concluded with a final statement that I paraphrased from a Maya Angelou quote: People don't remember what you say; they remember how you made them feel. It is a statement that I share with staff and students, and for me it is at the foundation of the type of teacher I strive to be. It is also at the core of the safe and supported tenets of the whole child approach.

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Kelli Windsor

Resilience Starts with School Breakfast

As kids head back to school, educators are focused on how to best ensure students succeed in the classroom and in life. That involves students being stronger, wiser, and more powerful. New findings from a national survey released by whole child partner Share Our Strength's No Kid Hungry campaign show that breakfast is key to academic success and ensuring resilience for students. The findings also show that rethinking how we serve school breakfast is crucial to enhancing the educational experience for all.

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Pam Allyn

Field Notes: Raising Learning Warriors

Moses was my student in Brooklyn, N.Y. He came from Guyana, was 10 years old, and deaf. His mother, who spoke no English and knew no one in New York, had made the treacherous journey to the United States to give him the opportunity to go to school. He was the skinniest boy I had ever seen, with longer-than-long legs that he sometimes tripped over when he ran. Moses was not getting enough to eat at home, so I started bringing him food. Some days, he did not eat from the time he left me until the next morning at school.

Moses and his mother lived in one tiny room where the heat sometimes did not work. His mother worked two jobs and was rarely home for more than an hour when Moses returned from school. Yet here he was, at long last, in a school for the deaf where he could finally thrive and learn.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Implications of the New “Poor”

Post written by Pam Capasso, Sara Gogel, Tracy Knight, and Janine Norris of Holly Glen Elementary School in Williamstown, N.J.

Holly Glen Elementary School serves approximately 580 students with one-third on free or reduced-price meals. Our school houses English language learners, students with autism, and students from low-income housing. In the past, Holly Glen comprised various socioeconomic levels ranging from upper class to lower income.

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