Tagged “The New Poverty”

ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

How We Know Kids Living in Poverty Can Meet the Common Core Standards

The Common Core State Standards underscore five key shifts in teaching and learning that place greater emphasis on

  1. Critical thinking, reasoning, and use of evidence to defend an argument.
  2. Deeper conceptual understanding, particularly in math.
  3. Writing, not only through explicit standards for writing, but also through the need to communicate one's reasoning through writing.
  4. Applying learning to real-world situations.
  5. Using informational texts to build content knowledge and literacy.

The shifts embodied in the standards necessitate that students become self-regulating, metacognitive learners. And for each shift, a body of research points toward pedagogies that are particularly effective in helping students who live in poverty meet and achieve the skills, knowledge, and dispositions embodied in the shifts. The brief descriptions below describe these research-based approaches in relationship to a particular shift; however, many of these approaches could apply to more than one shift. The purpose is not to "sell" or promote a particular approach, but rather to illuminate the large volume of evidence that can challenge our mind-sets about students from low-income families and their ability to learn to high standards.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

2013 Best of the Blog: 20–16

In the past year, experts and practitioners in the field, whole child partners, and ASCD staff have shared their stories, ideas, and resources to help you ensure that each child, in each school, in each community is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged and prepared for success in higher education, employment, and civic life.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Great Teaching Transcends Economic Hurdles

Post submitted on behalf of whole child partner American Association of School Librarians by Patty Saidenberg, librarian, George Jackson Academy, New York, N.Y.

I work as a librarian at George Jackson Academy (GJA) in New York, N.Y. Founded in 2002, GJA is an independent, nonsectarian upper elementary and middle school for academically capable boys from low-income and underserved families. Classes are small, teachers are passionate, and money is tight. That said, our graduates have attended some of the best high schools and private day schools in the nation. GJA graduates attend Columbia University, Princeton, NYU, and Wesleyan.

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Mary E. Walsh

Support All Students to Close the Achievement Gap

City Connects

More than 16 million children in the United States live in poverty, which dramatically affects their ability to come to school ready to learn and thrive. The latest data from the National Center for Education Statistics' The Condition of Education 2013 (PDF) report shows that one in five schools was considered high poverty in 2011, an increase from one in eight schools in 2000.

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Klea Scharberg

Three Common Factors in High-Poverty, High-Performing Schools

ASCD authors William Parrett and Kathleen Budge frame some of the factors found in high-performing, high-poverty schools. In these schools, community members are engaged in shifting the culture to one of possibility by acknowledging positive change, teachers are making instructional adjustments to meet the challenges of complex texts, and all are focused on relationship building that pushes the community to higher expectations. Learn more with ASCD Express.

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ASCD Whole Child Bloggers

Escaping the Closed Circle of High School Reform

Post written by Robert Halpern, director of the doctoral program and chair of the research council at the Erikson Institute in Chicago.

A recent documentary,180 Days: A Year Inside an American High School, perfectly captures the lack of imagination of current high school reform efforts in the United States. In this documentary the beleaguered principal and staff of Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan High School scramble to prepare students for the D.C. CAS, a standardized test on which their individual and collective fates rest. (I will withhold the ending, for those of you who have not yet seen the documentary, directed by Jacquie Jones of the National Black Programming Consortium.)

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Richard Cardillo

One of the Biggest Bullies

The vast majority of our work at the National School Climate Center (NSCC) revolves around three core efforts:

Yet, when I first speak to people about what we do, the inevitable conclusion or connection made is that "you're the guys that do bully prevention." Indeed, NSCC has robust and comprehensive bully-prevention resources that are student centered, aligned with core curriculum standards, and (amazingly!) free. And we work arduously and continuously to make sure our bully-prevention efforts align with a larger framework to promote safe, supportive, welcoming, civically engaging, challenging, and joyous schools for all students. One metaphor I use to capture the idea that bully prevention is part of a broader school climate effort is to compare bullying to the proverbial "canary in a coal mine." I tend to believe that if there are bullying issues present in a school community, it is a symptom of other deeper issues.

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Emily Buchanan

Defining a Positive School Climate and Measuring the Impact

Last month (April 2013), the National School Climate Center and Fordham University concluded that "sustained positive school climate is associated with positive child and youth development, effective risk-prevention and health-promotion efforts, student learning and academic achievement, increased student graduation rates, and teacher retention."

Having gained increasing potency in the lexicon of education reformers of late, a glut of studies has cemented the concept and significance of the school climate. However, having considered more than 200 research papers that all pointed to the aforementioned conclusion, the Fordham University study uncovered one major issue: What actually constitutes a "positive school climate?"

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Klea Scharberg

Reducing the Effects of Child Poverty

In today's global economic state, many families and children face reduced circumstances. The 2008 economic crisis became a "household crisis" (PDF) when higher costs for basic goods, fewer jobs and reduced wages, diminished assets and reduced access to credit, and reduced access to public goods and services affected families who coped, in part, by eating fewer and less nutritious meals, spending less on education and health care, and pulling children out of school to work or help with younger siblings. These "new poor" join those who were vulnerable prior to the financial shocks and economic downturn.

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Sean Slade

Improving Schools: Relationships, Personalization, Learning

Repeated refrains of the 2013 ASCD Whole Child Virtual Conference, held just two weeks ago, were the importance to form relationships with students, develop a personalized approach to teaching, and enhance learning. These concepts are all around us in education today:

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