Klea Scharberg

Throughout September: Resilience

Resilience—the ability of each of us to "bounce back stronger, wiser, and more personally powerful" (Nan Henderson); "not only survive, but also learn to thrive" (Bonnie Benard); or even to "bungy jump through the pitfalls of life" (Andrew Fuller)—is more than a trait: it's a process that can and should be taught, learned, and required. Being resilient helps youth navigate the world around them, and schools and classrooms are becoming more attuned to providing the cognitive, emotional, and developmental supports needed for resilience to prosper and grow in each of us.

"If children are given the chance to believe they're worth something—if they truly believe that—they will insist upon it" (Maya Angelou). With that in mind, what benefits do schools, classrooms, and students gain through increased attention to resilience teaching and development? Join us throughout September as we look at how resilience is best developed and whether it should be taught as a curriculum, integrated across all content areas, or organically developed by each student.

The Whole Child Podcast

Download the Whole Child Podcast Thursday, September 5, for a discussion on resilience and what it looks like in the classroom and how it can be developed across schools. You'll hear from

  • Sara Truebridge, an education consultant on resilience who has collaborated on the 2009 documentary film Race to Nowhere and is the author of the forthcoming book, Resilience: It Begins with Beliefs.
  • Andrew Fuller, a clinical psychologist and author who has worked with many schools and communities around Australia, specializing in the well-being of young people and their families. He is a Fellow of the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Learning and Educational Development at the University of Melbourne.

The Whole Child Blog

Check out the Whole Child Blog for contributions from experts and practitioners in the field; whole child partners; and ASCD staff, who will share free resources, provide examples, and answer your questions. Be sure to leave your questions, ideas, and stories in the comments.

Social Networking

Connect (if you haven't already) with the Whole Child Initiative on Facebook and Twitter and be part of changing the conversation about the importance of a whole child approach to education with more than 20,000 people from around the globe.

Comments (1)

Donna Volpitta, Ed.D.

September 9, 2013

I am an educator who works in the field of resilience.  Would be happy to discuss ways that I might share the work that I am doing.  http://www.urresilient.com

Share |

Blog Archive

Blog Tags